Nature and design...
Cup of coffee and city lights...



About me:
female, single and Polish


If you'd like to say "hello": martalako[at]orange.pl


Note:
I do not have any rights to the photos, graphic, films or pictures featured on this page (Except my own photos, of course.).
All those are credited to their rightful owners.






Przyłącz się do WWF


Take action now to save Darfur

12th April 2014

Photo reblogged from HIPSTERFOOD with 645 notes

hipsterfood:

Easy Almond Milk
We just realized that one of our kitchen staples, homemade almond milk, wasn’t fully posted on our blog. Technically we had a post, THREE years ago (!) but it wasn’t extremely comprehensive. Here’s how to make some almond milk for yourself!
Obviously you can buy it, but I like making my own when I need a LOT or if I’m out of it, which is often because it usually comes in such small containers. Also, you save a lot on packaging & shipping by making it yourself.
What you’ll need:
almonds, about .5-1.5 cups depending on how much you want to make
water!
a blender
a mesh bag (like we used in our chai concentrate the other day)
a funnel
a large bowl, preferably with a spout
bottles/jars with tops for storage (we use old pasta sauce jars, very useful things)
How to make it:
Pour the almonds into the large bowl, then cover with water. Leave them to soak for a couple of hours, ideally 8 hours if you have a less powerful blender. The longer you soak them, the creamier your outcome. I usually go with 1.5 cups almonds, which makes enough milk for a week’s worth in our house and fits nicely in our blender. I don’t think it needs to be exact, just check the consistency as you go to make it how you want/need it.
Drain the water and rinse the almonds. Pour them into a blender with enough water to cover, then about a cup or two more. Blend on high for a few minutes, or until the almonds are completely pulverized and it’s creamy and smooth.
In your large bowl, place the mesh bag in it, folding it over the sides of the bowl so that you don’t make a mess. Pour the milk into the bag, lift the sides of it and squeeze the liquid out into the bowl. Do this until all that’s left in the bag is dried almond pulp.*
Pour the strained liquid into your storage jars, using a funnel if necessary. Repeat the straining until everything in your blender is gone.
Pour 1/4 tsp vanilla and a dash of cinnamon into each jar, then stir to combine. If you’d like sweetened milk, add in 1 tbsp maple syrup or other liquid sweetener and give it a shake. (I like to add these after straining so you get the full flavor.)
*If you’re interested in not wasting a bit of this process, save the almond pulp! You can either use it again to make more milk (great for baking) or use it in baked goods such as pie crusts, crackers, or in batters. Just store it in a sealed container in the fridge for up to two weeks. (I haven’t tried storing it longer than that, though I’m sure you could.)
This milk lasts about 5-7 days in the fridge - use it in cereal, baking, curries, hot chai, or to make creamy smoothies! I’ll be using it tomorrow for my birthday cake, which might grace the blog ;)
If you’re looking for more non-dairy milk recipes, we have a REALLY comprehensive guide in the Spring 2013 issue of Chickpea Mag - there are recipes to make use of the almond pulp, how to make make milk out of pretty much any nut/seed/grain, best techniques, and best add-ins for each type. Check it out here in print or digitally.
Enjoy! :)

hipsterfood:

Easy Almond Milk

We just realized that one of our kitchen staples, homemade almond milk, wasn’t fully posted on our blog. Technically we had a post, THREE years ago (!) but it wasn’t extremely comprehensive. Here’s how to make some almond milk for yourself!

Obviously you can buy it, but I like making my own when I need a LOT or if I’m out of it, which is often because it usually comes in such small containers. Also, you save a lot on packaging & shipping by making it yourself.

What you’ll need:

  • almonds, about .5-1.5 cups depending on how much you want to make
  • water!
  • a blender
  • a mesh bag (like we used in our chai concentrate the other day)
  • a funnel
  • a large bowl, preferably with a spout
  • bottles/jars with tops for storage (we use old pasta sauce jars, very useful things)

How to make it:

  1. Pour the almonds into the large bowl, then cover with water. Leave them to soak for a couple of hours, ideally 8 hours if you have a less powerful blender. The longer you soak them, the creamier your outcome. I usually go with 1.5 cups almonds, which makes enough milk for a week’s worth in our house and fits nicely in our blender. I don’t think it needs to be exact, just check the consistency as you go to make it how you want/need it.
  2. Drain the water and rinse the almonds. Pour them into a blender with enough water to cover, then about a cup or two more. Blend on high for a few minutes, or until the almonds are completely pulverized and it’s creamy and smooth.
  3. In your large bowl, place the mesh bag in it, folding it over the sides of the bowl so that you don’t make a mess. Pour the milk into the bag, lift the sides of it and squeeze the liquid out into the bowl. Do this until all that’s left in the bag is dried almond pulp.*
  4. Pour the strained liquid into your storage jars, using a funnel if necessary. Repeat the straining until everything in your blender is gone.
  5. Pour 1/4 tsp vanilla and a dash of cinnamon into each jar, then stir to combine. If you’d like sweetened milk, add in 1 tbsp maple syrup or other liquid sweetener and give it a shake. (I like to add these after straining so you get the full flavor.)

*If you’re interested in not wasting a bit of this process, save the almond pulp! You can either use it again to make more milk (great for baking) or use it in baked goods such as pie crusts, crackers, or in batters. Just store it in a sealed container in the fridge for up to two weeks. (I haven’t tried storing it longer than that, though I’m sure you could.)

This milk lasts about 5-7 days in the fridge - use it in cereal, baking, curries, hot chai, or to make creamy smoothies! I’ll be using it tomorrow for my birthday cake, which might grace the blog ;)

If you’re looking for more non-dairy milk recipes, we have a REALLY comprehensive guide in the Spring 2013 issue of Chickpea Mag - there are recipes to make use of the almond pulp, how to make make milk out of pretty much any nut/seed/grain, best techniques, and best add-ins for each type. Check it out here in print or digitally.

Enjoy! :)

8th April 2014

Photo reblogged from PedalFar! with 71,586 notes

Source: ForGIFs.com

8th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Δ S > 0 with 2,871 notes

compoundchem:

The colours & chemistry of some common pH indicators: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-aM
PDF download via the above link, and also available to purchase in large poster form here.

compoundchem:

The colours & chemistry of some common pH indicators: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-aM

PDF download via the above link, and also available to purchase in large poster form here.

Source: compoundchem

8th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from crooked indifference with 4,002 notes

crookedinspiration:

fabriciomora:

How Did Famous Creative People Spend Their Days?

Creative Routines by RJ Andrews  

I love this.

Source: fabriciomora

25th March 2014

Photo reblogged from LUSHLIGHT with 34 notes

urbanfragment:

Le phare de l’infini by Nicolas Rottiers.

urbanfragment:

Le phare de l’infini by Nicolas Rottiers.

Source: urbanfragment

15th March 2014

Photoset reblogged from Δ S > 0 with 1,367 notes

thescienceofreality:

Happy Pi Day, everyone! | March 14, 2014

Image Credits: First two screenshots above via The Science of Reality, third image below via PiDay.org

Pi Day is celebrated on March 14th (3/14) around the world. Pi (Greek letter “π”) is the symbol used in mathematics to represent a constant — the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter — which is approximately 3.14159.

Pi has been calculated to over one trillion digits beyond its decimal point. As an irrational and transcendental number, it will continue infinitely without repetition or pattern. While only a handful of digits are needed for typical calculations, Pi’s infinite nature makes it a fun challenge to memorize, and to computationally calculate more and more digits.

Circle DiagramPi (π) is the ratio of a circle’s circumference to its diameter. Pi is a constant number, meaning that for all circles of any size, Pi will be the same.

The diameter of a circle is the distance from edge to edge, measuring straight through the center. The circumference of a circle is the distance around.

HISTORY OF PI

By measuring circular objects, it has always turned out that a circle is a little more than 3 times its width around. In the Old Testament of the Bible (1 Kings 7:23), a circular pool is referred to as being 30 cubits around, and 10 cubits across. The mathematician Archimedes used polygons with many sides to approximate circles and determined that Pi was approximately 22/7. The symbol (Greek letter “π”) was first used in 1706 by William Jones. A ‘p’ was chosen for ‘perimeter’ of circles, and the use of π became popular after it was adopted by the Swiss mathematician Leonhard Euler in 1737. In recent years, Pi has been calculated to over one trillion digits past its decimal. Only 39 digits past the decimal are needed to accurately calculate the spherical volume of our entire universe, but because of Pi’s infinite & patternless nature, it’s a fun challenge to memorize, and to computationally calculate more and more digits.

GEOMETRY

The number pi is extremely useful when solving geometry problems involving circles. Here are some examples:

• The area of a circle:

A = πr2

Where ‘r’ is the radius (distance from the center to the edge of the circle). Also, this formula is the origin of the joke “Pies aren’t square, they’re round!”

• The volume of a cylinder:

V = πr2h

To find the volume of a rectangular prism, you calculate length × width × height. In that case, length × width is the area of one side (the base), which is then multiplied by the height of the prism. Similarly, to find the volume of a cylinder, you calculate the area of the base (the area of the circle), then multiply that by the height (h) of the cylinder.

Via PiDay.org

Source: thescienceofreality

5th March 2014

Photo reblogged from Of course I like you, you are you! with 1,028 notes

Source: coffeenuts

2nd March 2014

Photoset reblogged from LUSHLIGHT with 33,845 notes

lushlight:

nevver:

1920

Yay selfie!

Source: collections.mcny.org

2nd March 2014

Photoset reblogged from Not Porn with 356,014 notes

The beautiful United States of America

This is nice.

Source: leodcaprio

1st March 2014

Photo reblogged from LUSHLIGHT with 1,095 notes

man-without-fear:

 

man-without-fear:

 

Source: putthison