Nature and design...
Cup of coffee and city lights...



About me:
female, single and Polish


If you'd like to say "hello": martalako[at]orange.pl


Note:
I do not have any rights to the photos, graphic, films or pictures featured on this page (Except my own photos, of course.).
All those are credited to their rightful owners.






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8th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from crooked indifference with 4,292 notes

crookedinspiration:

fabriciomora:

How Did Famous Creative People Spend Their Days?

Creative Routines by RJ Andrews  

I love this.

Source: fabriciomora

25th March 2014

Photo reblogged from LUSHLIGHT with 37 notes

urbanfragment:

Le phare de l’infini by Nicolas Rottiers.

urbanfragment:

Le phare de l’infini by Nicolas Rottiers.

Source: urbanfragment

15th March 2014

Photoset reblogged from Δ S > 0 with 1,360 notes

thescienceofreality:

Happy Pi Day, everyone! | March 14, 2014

Image Credits: First two screenshots above via The Science of Reality, third image below via PiDay.org

Pi Day is celebrated on March 14th (3/14) around the world. Pi (Greek letter “π”) is the symbol used in mathematics to represent a constant — the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter — which is approximately 3.14159.

Pi has been calculated to over one trillion digits beyond its decimal point. As an irrational and transcendental number, it will continue infinitely without repetition or pattern. While only a handful of digits are needed for typical calculations, Pi’s infinite nature makes it a fun challenge to memorize, and to computationally calculate more and more digits.

Circle DiagramPi (π) is the ratio of a circle’s circumference to its diameter. Pi is a constant number, meaning that for all circles of any size, Pi will be the same.

The diameter of a circle is the distance from edge to edge, measuring straight through the center. The circumference of a circle is the distance around.

HISTORY OF PI

By measuring circular objects, it has always turned out that a circle is a little more than 3 times its width around. In the Old Testament of the Bible (1 Kings 7:23), a circular pool is referred to as being 30 cubits around, and 10 cubits across. The mathematician Archimedes used polygons with many sides to approximate circles and determined that Pi was approximately 22/7. The symbol (Greek letter “π”) was first used in 1706 by William Jones. A ‘p’ was chosen for ‘perimeter’ of circles, and the use of π became popular after it was adopted by the Swiss mathematician Leonhard Euler in 1737. In recent years, Pi has been calculated to over one trillion digits past its decimal. Only 39 digits past the decimal are needed to accurately calculate the spherical volume of our entire universe, but because of Pi’s infinite & patternless nature, it’s a fun challenge to memorize, and to computationally calculate more and more digits.

GEOMETRY

The number pi is extremely useful when solving geometry problems involving circles. Here are some examples:

• The area of a circle:

A = πr2

Where ‘r’ is the radius (distance from the center to the edge of the circle). Also, this formula is the origin of the joke “Pies aren’t square, they’re round!”

• The volume of a cylinder:

V = πr2h

To find the volume of a rectangular prism, you calculate length × width × height. In that case, length × width is the area of one side (the base), which is then multiplied by the height of the prism. Similarly, to find the volume of a cylinder, you calculate the area of the base (the area of the circle), then multiply that by the height (h) of the cylinder.

Via PiDay.org

Source: thescienceofreality

5th March 2014

Photo reblogged from Of course I like you, you are you! with 1,100 notes

Source: coffeenuts

2nd March 2014

Photoset reblogged from LUSHLIGHT with 36,514 notes

lushlight:

nevver:

1920

Yay selfie!

Source: collections.mcny.org

2nd March 2014

Photoset reblogged from Not Your Babe with 391,541 notes

The beautiful United States of America

This is nice.

Source: jesse-pinkman

1st March 2014

Photo reblogged from LUSHLIGHT with 1,103 notes

man-without-fear:

 

man-without-fear:

 

Source: putthison

20th February 2014

Photo reblogged from Δ S > 0 with 3,574 notes

ilovecharts:

Handy English/American vocabulary chart for foodies. Buy the print here.

This is nice idea. :)

ilovecharts:

Handy English/American vocabulary chart for foodies. Buy the print here.

This is nice idea. :)

Source: ilovecharts

15th February 2014

Photo

Zbigniew Bródka- Fireman and gold medalist from Sochi.Photo: PAP

Zbigniew Bródka- Fireman and gold medalist from Sochi.

Photo: PAP

15th February 2014

Photo

Justyna Kowalczyk, our cross-country skiing Quin and gold medalist from Sochi.
Photo: PAP

Justyna Kowalczyk, our cross-country skiing Quin and gold medalist from Sochi.

Photo: PAP